gardens

Nestled in it’s own secluded gardens, the Mount Edgcumbe commands an elevated view of Tunbridge Wells Common overflowing with warmth and charm, this dog friendly Georgian gem offers unique lounges, seasonal British dining, local ales, exclusive wines and an atmosphere that, whatever the occasion, is the perfect place to eat, drink, relax and enjoy.

A stylish 16th century pub, restaurant and hotel with a wood-burning fireplace, as well as a beer garden, a deep history of smugglers and a Georgian ballroom!

Zagatos bar and brasserie in The Spa Hotel welcomes non-residents.

Afternoon tea can be enjoyed daily from midday to 6p.m. in the beautiful Lobby or Orangery. Classic afternoon tea includes a selection of sandwiches, home-made scones and delicious cakes. Champagne tea includes the addition of a glass of Champagne.

Zagotos Bar and Brasserie is perfect for guests and local residents looking for a more relaxed dining experience. The extensive Zagatos menu offers diners an vast array of choice, using only the freshest, local ingredients in our dishes.

The Orangery Restaurant where the service is warm and friendly with a relaxed atmosphere offers cuisine on a classically based modern British theme, complemented by an extensive and carefully selected wine list.

Spectacular rhododendrons, azaleas, fine specimen trees, roses, bluebells, natural woodland walks, children’s play area, café; house open to pre-booked groups (min 20) and dog friendly.

Haysden Country Park covers an area of about 65 hectares (160 acres) including a range of habitats such as river, grassland, freshwater lakes, marshland and woodland, all dog friendly.

Welcome to your fairy-tale adventure in the Garden of England!

Groombridge Place near Tunbridge Wells promises a fun day out for all the family providing award winning manicured gardens, Crusoe’s world adventure playground, the Romany camp, the Owl and Raptor Centre, the Enchanted Forest – with its hidden woodland characters, giant tree swings, tree canopy walkway, river boat ride – and other thrills of the imagination to discover.

The moated manor house itself was rebuilt in 1662 by Philip Packer when Charles II ruled to replace a medieval building that can be traced back to 1230.Enjoy a trip on the canal boat along the River Grom flowing in the grounds between the gardens and the Enchanted Forest.

You can see the heritage Spa Valley Railway engines and carriages snaking their way through the Wealden countryside from the heights of the climbing courses.

The gardens feature a giant chess game which you can play, a board-walk through the forest and a maze! The birds of prey show their flying skills off twice a day.

The different formal garden areas were designed by John Evelyn in the late 17th century. The Secret Garden contains blue agapanthus and gazania amongst other blooms. The Knot Garden has a tantalising tulip display in spring. The White Rose Garden stars in the artistry of diverse shades of white. The Oriental Garden comes to life thanks to the fiery colours of dazzling Japanese maples. The Drunken Garden’s highlights are veronica, clematis, ceanothus and lilies in blue and yellow.

As if this isn’t enough, there is a Sherlock Holmes museum too! The connection is that the setting for Conan Doyle’s novel The Valley of Fear is right here. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle used to visit his friends who owned the property in the late 1800s on a regular basis. He thought his friends’ estate was the perfect backdrop for this mystery thriller, the final Sherlock Holmes book. The museum displays the artefacts and links between the property and the author.

Keep an eye out for the native wildlife especially in the deer park and the birds and animals including the peacocks, pony, donkey and famous zedonk!!

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Great Dixter is an historic house, a garden, a centre of education, and a place of pilgrimage for horticulturists from across the world.

7 acres of gardens with beautiful and rare plants surrounding a 17th century manor house.

Beautiful hillside gardens and woodland with spectacular views.

Owned by Knights, courtiers to Henry VIII and society Victorians, this moated manor dates from 1320 reflecting seven centuries of history from the Medieval crypt, to a 1950’s library.

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